The visual stimulation your baby receives provides vital ingredients that can improve your baby's curiosity, attention span, memory, and nervous system development.

Why is it essential for young babies to have visual stimulation?

What do we mean by visual stimulation in babies?

Visual stimulation can take many forms. Essentially it means giving children and babies a variety of things to look at that will attract their attention and retain their focus.

Why is visual stimulation so important for your baby?

Children who are deprived of visual stimulation (those kept in the same environment with little of interest to focus on) may have lasting neurological deficits and be disadvantaged in many areas of development as a result. Babies that receive powerful visual stimulation from colours, shapes and patterns have better brain growth and faster visual development. As well as encouraging physical, emotional and cognitive development, visual stimulation in babies helps promote curiosity and an interest in exploring his world.

Warm, bright colours for emotional development.

Daggett and Cobble (2008) found that young children are attracted to warm, bright colours that were found to improve attention span and increase productivity.

Moreover, their research showed that different colours can produce varying physical responses in the body, and which can have an effect on blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature and brain activity. It has been found that different colours can stimulate or reduce hormone production and alpha brain wave activity, thus altering many functions including anxiety, alertness, concentration, energy levels, etc. Therefore it is clear that colour has strong psychological and physiological influences, especially on emotions and feelings.

Shapes and patterns help babies develop memory and much more!

As babies develop, they use visual cues to aid memory. Familiar visual stimuli are beneficial in reassuring a baby and distinctive visual stimuli provide more specific cues. For example, the windows in a house are often the same,

so the baby looking at the windows may realize that he’s in his own house, but not necessarily where in it, whereas the cot bars are only in his bedroom so when he sees cot bars he may start to remember other things associated with his room, such as bedtime or story time. The more distinctive and familiar the visual stimulus, the more evocative an effect it has.

Summary: The visual stimulation your baby receives provides vital ingredients that can improve your baby's curiosity, attention span, memory, and nervous system development.

Article written in consultation with a Leading Child Psychologist, Dr. Amanda Gummer.